Folds

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MarcusLaGrone
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Folds

Post by MarcusLaGrone » Sat Jul 25, 2015 5:50 pm

hey, Lori!
Okay, here is something I ran into after web surfing the "Summer Challenge"... My question isn't so much how to interpret the "pattern" (although that would be helpful) but rather how to get MD to make the cloth hang like that. Love the folds!
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LoriGriffiths
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Re: Folds

Post by LoriGriffiths » Sat Jul 25, 2015 6:19 pm

The draping is done by placing the pattern on the bias. More on that in a moment.

The pattern on the left is a standard bodice pattern. They have used the 'slash and spread' technique to add more material for draping. Those five slashes are made and then the pattern is spread apart. You'll notice that this technique adds a substantial amount of fabric, but does not change the sizing of the pattern. The top will still fit just as perfectly as the basic bodice, but now it has more fabric to drape in the center.

Woven fabric consists of vertical and horizontal threads (warp and weft). Most pattern pieces are laid out to be cut square to these threads. That gives the garment structure and holds it's shape.
StraightOfGrain.jpg
Straight Grain Placement
StraightOfGrain.jpg (235.34 KiB) Viewed 2503 times
When you want to create draping, you need to lay the pattern on the bias, which is 45 degrees off grain.
BiasDiagram.jpg
Bias
BiasDiagram.jpg (262.03 KiB) Viewed 2503 times
When you cut the pattern this way, it has no structure. It will not hang square and edges will not stay even. Not what you want traditionally, but perfect for draping.
BiasGrain.jpg
Bias Layout
BiasGrain.jpg (244.46 KiB) Viewed 2503 times
If you want to learn more about this and how it works in MD, here's a tutorial I did.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ssFEuxE3n-M

When I did the video, I didn't realize that MD does recognize the bias. The 2D view is square to warp and weft. If you place your pattern at 45 degrees, it is bias and MD will recognize it as such.

Hope that helps.

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MarcusLaGrone
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Re: Folds

Post by MarcusLaGrone » Mon Jul 27, 2015 2:15 am

Okay, clocking the fabric 45 did help. I ended up dropping the simulation size to 5mm. (ack!) I also ended up using "Jersey" as the fabric. Would there be a better choice of fabrics?

(What is the real-world difference between Jersey and jersey 20? I saw your spreadsheet, but what is the origin of the "20" moniker? Is that a weight, a year... ???)

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LoriGriffiths
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Re: Folds

Post by LoriGriffiths » Tue Jul 28, 2015 2:23 pm

I have no idea of the moniker. Their Clo3D product cloth seems to be different from their MD, so perhaps that is the difference? Don't forget that you can always make your own fabric, too. If you find something close, just play around with it until you get what you like.

Also, don't get hung up on the names. Use the fabric that does the job. When I do a binding edge on a t-shirt, which should be knit in the real world, I use cotton. It holds the binding square for uv mapping outside of MD. If you are familiar with fabric properties, the names will just give you some idea of it's behavior.

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